5 Common Myths about Lightning Safety

Lightning is not a force to be trifled with. You may be surprised to discover that much of what we think about lightning isn’t true. Below are five common myths about lightning along with the facts to keep you safer.

Myth 1: Without rain clouds, lightning can’t exist. Lightning can strike miles away from visible rain clouds. Although not as frequent, lightning bolts have been recorded to strike as far as 10 miles outside the area of their clouds of origin.

Myth 2: During a thunderstorm, sheltering under a tree is safer than no shelter at all. Trees, especially large ones, are often magnets for lightning, making this course of action more dangerous than no shelter at all. The safest thing during a lightning storm is to go home or duck into a shop or restaurant.

Myth 3: Lightning never strikes twice in the same place. This myth might encourage someone to return to where lightning struck so they will not be hit by lightning. The Empire State Building is often hit multiple times by a single lightning storm.

Myth 4: Lie flat on the ground during a lightning storm to avoid being hit by lightning or electrocuted. Lightning can generate currents in all directions. Lying flat on the ground provides more potential points to be hit by electrical currents if lightning strikes the ground.

Myth 5: Lightning will only strike the tallest buildings and objects. Lightning can strike anywhere and injure anyone. The safest thing to do when lightning begins to strike is to seek shelter in a home or building and avoid any outside-leading conducting paths, such as wires, metal window frames and electrical appliances.

Standard homeowners insurance and the comprehensive portion of your auto policy covers property damage from lightning (for example, fires). But if you have any questions about this, please give us a call. We are always here to help make sure your home and family are protected and safe.